Fellowships

Visiting Research Scholar Fellowship 2017-2018

The International Research Center for Japanese Studies (Kyoto, Japan) is pleased to announce an opening for one or two foreign scholars to reside at the Center and participate during the Japanese academic year 2017-2018 in one of the following team research projects:

  1. Outline
  2. A. East Asian Kingship and Social Order in a Comparative Context: Courts, Empires and States/ Thought, Religion and Rites

     Since antiquity the countries and peoples of East Asia have come under the overwhelming influence of the Chinese empire, introducing from it as their shared foundations not only political and institutional systems such as the ritsuryō codes but Chinese characters and classical literature, Confucianism, Chinese Buddhism, and other aspects of intellectual culture. And while for these outlying countries China was held up as the model, it hardly needs saying that each evolved its own distinctive form of kingship and statehood. Over two long millennia, the traditional Chinese empire remained a vibrant cultural force, and even as it was transformed both in substance and in form over and over, it continues to represent a distinct cultural sphere even today. Meanwhile, in what ways did the areas in its periphery try to establish forms of kingship and political legitimacy that asserted their own identity? Our project will revisit the role played by Confucianism, Buddhism, and the other philosophical and religious traditions that informed kingship and local society, including their ritual and symbolic aspects, in each country. The study will extend to comparisons with other civilization spheres as deemed beneficial to the study.

    ※Questions regarding the details of the research project may be sent to Professor ITO Takayuki at the Center address, by e-mail at itotak*nichibun.ac.jp(Please change "*" to "@")


    B. Expos and Human History

     The history of expos began in London in 1851 and continued with great fanfare in various parts of Europe and the United States mainly until the first half of the twentieth century. That history extended to Asia for the first time only in 1970 with the opening of Expo ’70 in Osaka, Japan.
     In the twenty-first century, participation in that history has ranged widely over the greater Asia region, with Expo 2005 in Aichi Japan, Expo 2010 Shanghai in China, Expo 2012 Yeosu in Korea, Expo 2016 Antalya in Turkey, Expo 2017 Astana in Kazakhstan, and Expo 2020 Dubai in the UAE. The nature of expos, however, has not fundamentally changed; rather, they have gone on to play an impressive role in distinctive event phenomena that vividly reflect the state of international society. Invariably, expos provide important material, as well as settings, for embracing and discussing human affairs from every direction.
     This study, based on the results of the preceding team research project, “Expos and Human History, with a Focus on Asian Dynamics,” seeks to construct a field of “Expo studies” that will range across national boundaries and disciplines and build bridges between academia and the practical professions. Expo studies is not a narrow field concerned only with analyzing expos as events. It is a system of knowledge for exploring ways to convey the history of humankind through expos, in a language that anyone can understand.

    ※Questions regarding the details of the research project may be sent to Associate Professor SANO Mayuko at the Center address, by e-mail at m-sano*nichibun.ac.jp(Please change "*" to "@")


    C. Studies in “In-betweeness” in Cross-cultural Communication

     The Japanese word “sekinin” is translation of Western words such as “responsibility” and “Verantwortlichkeit.” The Japanese expression “sekinin o ou” (“take responsibility”) is posited in a context of passive assumption vis-a-vis an outside demand, and “sekinin ga aru” carries the impression of having assumed a moral responsibility. However, in English, the phrase “take responsibility” is premised on the notion of an actor actively assuming responsibility. This is just one example of cases where, while in Western languages an act that is understood as representing active effort on the part of the actor, in Japanese in many cases it is replaced in the Japanese expression by a passive response. There are countless examples, such as the way the use of passive expressions omitting the identity of the subject, which is common in Japanese government documents, is misinterpreted as shirking of responsibility to the point of causing diplomatic misunderstanding or the relationship of “omote” and “ura” is transformed in the translation into Western languages into “positive” and “negative.” Taking these kinds of specific examples as our point of departure, this project will examine the ramifications not only in terms of comparative linguistics and comparative culture, but the distortion of information through translation of cultural phenomena, the establishment of templates of cross-cultural communication, and aspects of the struggle for leadership.

    ※Questions regarding the details of the research project may be sent to Professor INAGA Shigemi at the Center address, by e-mail at aurora*nichibun.ac.jp(Please change "*" to "@")


    D. Projecting Classicism: Visuality, Popularity, and Modernity

     Research on the Classics today is in a rather uncomfortable position in the realm of scholarship. Partly due to institutional changes accompanying changing times, it has become difficult to adequately pursue traditional disciplines and approaches to education. This team research project will come to grips with this situation, engage a variety of specialists and editors conversant with the field, and through a series of discussions, broadly examine directions in classics research and the nature of classical studies. Key to our analysis will be the multifaceted implications of the term “project/projection”: presenting images, planned undertaking, standing out, project research, planning, etc. This study will approach the subject from the perspective of visuality, popularity, and modernity, and will take into account not only exegesis of the classics and the study of the history of reception of the classics but art, research methodology, education, and translations into modern language and other languages. Drawing from these perspectives and orientations, we will explore the interdisciplinary significance and international potential of classical studies that should be asserted for the near future of the humanities. In the process of this study, the project will link up with the Nichibunken’s core research project “Diachronic International Research into Mass Culture and the Construction of a New Image of Japan” and contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the fundamental nature and diversity of premodern Japanese culture.

    ※Questions regarding the details of the research project may be sent to Professor ARAKI Hiroshi at the Center address, by e-mail at hiroark*nichibun.ac.jp(Please change "*" to "@")


  3. Eligibility
    • Display evidence of prior research and publications directly related to the above research project.
    • Have a Ph.D. (or equivalent) and an academic position by the time of application.
    • Not more than 65 years old when the research period begins.

    ※For this fellowship, we especially welcome applications from younger scholars. The position is open with regard to discipline, and applicants need not be specialists of Japan; indeed, those able to offer comparative perspectives are especially welcome.
    However, discussions and presentations will be in Japanese, so knowledge of the language would be distinctly preferable.

  4. Research Period
  5. The scholar is expected to arrive in Kyoto someday between April 1 and October 3l, 2017; the fellowship runs from your arrival until March 31, 2018.
    Please be sure to arrive in Japan within 1 to 7 days before the starting date of your contract period.

  6. Terms of the scholar
    • The Visiting Research Scholar's salary will be determined on the basis of salary regulations and will reflect the Visiting Research Scholar's seniority. It will be paid on the appointed day each month.
    • Roundtrip travel expenses (economy class ticket only) will be paid.
    • A research allowance (including a domestic research travel expense allowance) will be disbursed to each Visiting Research Scholar.
    • The Center's library, computers, and other facilities, including an individual research room, will be made available for the use of the Visiting Research Scholar, in the same way as for a regular full-time employee of the Center.
    • Visiting Research Scholars have opportunities for presentation of research findings in seminars, public lectures, and the Nichibunken Forum held by the Center.
    • Housing accommodations will be available on the site of the Center. (There are charges for the use of these facilities.)
  7. Application form
  8. The application form may be downloaded from the following:

    you can open PDF files with Adobe Reader

  9. Application
  10. Submit via e-mail in PDF format to “ kyoudou*nichibun.ac.jp(Please change "*" to "@") ” by July 31, 2016.
    Be sure to add your signature at the end of the application form.

  11. Results
  12. Nichibunken will screen all applicants fairly and critically and will notify all applicants of the results late in December, 2016.

  13. For further information, contact:
  14. Research Support Unit
    Research Cooperation Section
    International Research Center for Japanese Studies
    3-2 Goryo Oeyama-cho, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 610-1192, JAPAN
    Tel : +81-75-335-2044
    Fax : +81-75-335-2092
    E-mail: kyoudou*nichibun.ac.jp(Please change "*" to "@")


Visiting Research Scholar (Team Research Organizer) 2018-2019

In order to deepen research on Japanese culture and broaden its scope by bringing together researchers from different fields of specialization, the International Research Center for Japanese Studies (Nichibunken) supports the “team research” (kyōdō kenkyū) approach to opening up new frontiers in Japanese studies scholarship.
Nichibunken seeks visiting research scholars to plan and organize one-year team research projects for the Japanese academic year 2018 (April)-2019 (March). Research themes of outstanding significance and future potential will be favorably considered.

  1. Role of the Team Research Organizer
  2. The team research organizer will be appointed as a Nichibunken visiting research scholar. He or she will be responsible for: selecting the project participants and organizing their project-related activities, drawing up and implementing the research plan; chairing research meetings; and collating the research results for publication.

  3. Other Participants in the Project
  4. Participants in the project must meet at least one of the following eligibilities: ⑴ researchers who are attached to a university or other research institution in or outside Japan or who have equivalent qualifications ⑵members of Nichibunken's faculty. A faculty member will assist the project organizer.

  5. Venue of Research Meetings
  6. Research meetings will be held at Nichibunken.

  7. Eligibility
  8. Researchers who are attached to a university or other research institution outside Japan and not more than 65 years old as of 1 April 2018, or whom the Director-general deems to have equivalent qualifications.

  9. Number of Openings
  10. Not more than two project organizers will be selected each year.

  11. Research Period
  12. The project runs for one year after the arrival of the organizer in Japan. The project organizer is expected to arrive in Kyoto between April 1 and August 31, 2018. Please be sure to arrive in Japan within 1 to 7 days before the starting date of your contract period.

  13. Application Procedure
    • Download the application form from the following:
    • icon_acrobat PDF file
      icon_word
       MS Word file

      you can open PDF files with Adobe Reader

    • Completed application form, with a list of prospective participants. In principle, most of the project participants should reside in Japan. The list must include at least one faculty member of Nichibunken. (Director-General, Deputy Director-General or Faculty)

      Before applying, please contact the faculty member(s) in question.
      List of Faculty: http://research.nichibun.ac.jp/en/

    • Submit via e-mail in PDF format to “ kyoudou*nichibun.ac.jp(Please change "*" to "@") ”
    • Be sure to add your signature at the end of the application form.

    • Deadline for application
    • The application form should be submitted by October 31, 2016.

    • For further information contact:
    • Research Support Unit
      Research Cooperation Section
      International Research Center for Japanese Studies
      Tel: +81-75-335-2044
      Fax: +81-75-335-2092
      E-mail: kyoudou*nichibun.ac.jp(Please change "*" to "@")

  14. Screening Results
  15. Nichibunken will screen all applicants fairly and critically and will notify all applicants of the results by March 31, 2017.

  16. Terms of Appointment
    • The Visiting Research Scholar's salary will be determined according to experience and career status. It will be paid on the appointed day each month.
    • Roundtrip travel expenses will be paid according to a rate stipulated in the regulations.
    • A research allowance (including a domestic research travel expense allowance) will be disbursed to each Visiting Research Scholar.
    • Nichibunken's library, computers, and other facilities, including an individual research office, will be made available for the use of the Visiting Research Scholar, in the same way as for regular full-time employees of Nichibunken.
    • Visiting Research Scholars will have opportunities to present their research findings in seminars, public lectures, and the Nichibunken Forums.
    • Housing accommodations will be available on the Nichibunken campus. (There are charges for the use of these facilities.)

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